John Moreland Net Worth

Others




John Moreland’s net worth is estimated at $1 Million – $5 Million.
John Moreland was born on 22 June, 1985 in Texas. Find out about the life of this billionaire, including John Moreland’s net worth, age, family, dating life, salary, and assets.

Popular As N/A
Occupation N/A
Age 36 years old
Zodiac Sign Cancer
Born 22 June 1985
Birthday 22 June
Birthplace Texas
Nationality Texas

What is John Moreland’s net worth?

John Moreland’s net worth has been growing in 2020-2021.John Moreland is 36 years old and has a net worth of $1 Million – $5 Million.

John Moreland Social Network

Instagram John Moreland Instagram
Linkedin
Twitter John Moreland Twitter
Facebook John Moreland Facebook
Wikipedia John Moreland Wikipedia
Imdb

Early Life: Source Wikipedia

2020

His fifth solo album, LP5, was released February 7th, 2020. It’s produced by Matt Pence of Centro-Matic and marks his return to the label Thirty Tigers, after his previous release via 4AD.

2017

In 2017, Moreland released his seventh album, Big Bad Luv, on 4AD. The title is a nod to the book by that name by Larry Brown. The record is the first where Moreland recorded with a full band. Musicians from the bands Dawes (Griffin and Taylor Goldsmith) and Shovels And Rope (Carrie Ann Hearst and Michael Trent) contributed vocals.

2015

In 2015, Moreland released High on Tulsa Heat, his third full-length solo record release. It was produced by Moreland and features Jesse Aycock, John Calvin Abney, Chris Foster, Jared Tyler, and Kierston White. The album was recorded quickly and informally over the course of a few days in July 2014. Moreland used his parents’ home in Bixby, Oklahoma, as a studio while they were out of town on vacation. A video of the song “Cherokee” was conceived and shot by Joey Kneiser, and features bass player Bingham Barnes. Both are from the band Glossary. Moreland said the song was inspired by a dream.

He is characterized as a songwriter’s songwriter. American television host and political commentator Rachel Maddow tweeted praise of Moreland’s work: “If the American music business made any sense, guys like John Moreland would be household names.” Moreland posits that Maddow probably saw him opening for Lucero, a band Maddow likes. Moreland jokes that her remark was “the first time his dad has agreed with Rachel Maddow.” During the summer of 2015, Moreland opened for Jason Isbell, Dawes, and Patty Griffin.

Around 2015, Moreland relocated to Norman, Oklahoma but then later that year moved back to Tulsa.

2013

Moreland participates in the Folk Alliance International Conference, a non-profit folk music conference that is held annually in Kansas City, Kansas. He participated in fellow singer-songwriter Jason Isbell’s 2013 national tour.

2011

Largely self-performed and self-produced, Moreland produces music that is influenced by his Oklahoma roots, music that is “gloriously and joyfully heartbreaking.” Moreland has released a constant stream of records (in 2011 he released two full length albums and two EPs), saying “I write a lot of songs. And I guess I feel like your most recent release kind of represents you.” Moreland has cited Steve Earle as his “gateway” to folk music. He switched genres from hardcore to folk when he heard Earle’s song “Rich Man’s War”. His father was also a big Earle fan. Other influences were Guy Clark and Townes van Zandt.

2005

Moreland put together the Black Gold Band in 2005, and released Endless Oklahoma Sky on Oklahoma City label Little Mafia Records in 2008. In 2009, he recorded the follow-up Things I Can’t Control at Armstrong Recording in Tulsa with producer and musician Stephen Egerton (Descendents, All).

2000

Moreland played in his first show when he was 13 or 14 years old. In the early 2000s during high school, Moreland played in local punk and hardcore bands, including local metalcore Oklahoma band, Thirty Called Arson.

1985

John Robert Moreland (born June 22, 1985) is an American singer-songwriter from Tulsa, Oklahoma.

The contents of this page are sourced from Wikipedia articles.The contents are available under the CC BY-SA 4.0 license.